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   Welcome to my blog! I'll be posting thoughts about art, photos, happenings, and other things that strike me--and hopefully my readers--as interesting. And please visit my website by clicking the link to the right--thanks!

   Also please check out my second blog, The Painting Archives to see older (pre-2004) paintings for sale.


Friday, January 30, 2009
  studio wall

I've been working on a group of smallish, single panel paintings, and a few of them are shown here tacked up on my studio wall. I don't think any of these are completely done--this is just a glimpse of what's in progress. But all have a number of layers of paint on them now, and subtle, interesting textural things are starting to happen.
 
Comments:
These are interesting! I’m intrigued.
 
I like this random installation of small panels. The larger one on the left is a knockout!
 
thanks--I worked on all of these some more today--
 
I like the juxtaposition of the various panels. I enjoy how the wall has become a painting with the various marks, drips and such left over from the past. Enlarging the photo the individual panels appear to be attached to a much larger canvas. I agree with the comment about the large panel on the left. I also find that the panel on the right , second one in from the edge with the blue green area is exquisite -very poetic.
 
Really nice work...They all need tons of white space and to move further away from each other--they are all working great. There is something that can happen with a small painting- a scale of mark making to size of the panel that makes them very bold. A scratch on a small painting becomes a gesture line and often is lost on a large painting. I always thought that that meant the approach to larger work therefore has to be more bold--the tools that much more to scale. It's a challenge.
 
Good thoughts, thanks. I have to smile about the "white space" since I've been meaning to repaint my studio wall--it is way too grimy and marked up to see anything on it to best advantage. Fortunately I do have another more pristine wall where I can view things one at a time.

I agree with you on the issues of scale--sometimes I see painters who are used to working on a small scale lose their power in a bigger format. It goes back to what you say--the considerations are different for what makes a larger painting work. There needs to be something to carry it, to justify its size I guess. Could be subtle things (I'm thinking of Rothko) but perhaps the approach in the painter's mind must be "bold" even if the result is subtle.
 
Spectacular collection. Seeing them all together is quite powerful. And the wall itself id pretty great too!
 
I just discover your work today! It is FANTASTIC! I really really love your work!
Very interesting!
 
Thank you Sylvie, I just bookmarked your blog--!
 
Hi Rebecca,
I found your blog while researching Ampersand Claybord. I'm excited about the range of possibilities of working on hard board.

Your paintings are rich in texture and your colors are earthy rich.
 
thanks Chewy...I really like all the ampersand boards--they do offer a lot of possibilities for building up textures---PLUS (maybe my favorite part) all you have to do is take off the plastic and paint. I was never big on gessoing and other prep to paint.
 
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