.comment-link {margin-left:.6em;}
   Welcome to my blog! I'll be posting thoughts about art, photos, happenings, and other things that strike me--and hopefully my readers--as interesting. And please visit my website by clicking the link to the right--thanks!

   Also please check out my second blog, The Painting Archives to see older (pre-2004) paintings for sale.


Saturday, December 29, 2012
  drawing lines


I've been working with memories of the Irish landscape, and the painting above, Iveraugh, 12"x 12" (mixed media on panel) is one of the small pieces I've finished in the past few days. Along with the memory and emotion in the painting, I also have a formal interest in the tension between the color fields and the line drawing, done here in a gestural and energetic way. Lines have been growing more important in my work in the past few years, since 2008 after a residency in the Catalonia region Spain, when I did a lot of sketching in the mountainous landscape. Those sketches translated into a type of sketchy line drawing in the abstract paintings that followed once I was back home, such as the one below, Old Wall Barcelona (oil and mixed media on panel, 2008, collection of Max and Emely McConkey.)



With their direct and simple presence, lines give the viewer a sense of the artist's hand. I like the contrast between this effect and the way that the color fields in my work are perceived. Color fields have an essentially mysterious presence--it is never clear how the complex surface came about, how these particular effects were achieved, oftentimes even to me. The process I use involves building up and tearing down layers of oil paint mixed with cold wax medium along with a few other materials such as powdered pigment, sand and pastel. There are complex interactions between the layers, and in the end there is as much buried as revealed. To then draw freely into the surface with a skewer or palette knife tip is a very different process. I like to think the result evokes different aspects of experience--the deeper, hidden layers and the more spontaneous and overt.

I've also used lines in my work many times in a more structured way, as grids, horizontals and verticals. In my multiple panel paintings the lines formed by adjacent and contrasting panels are strong and geometric, while those I draw into the work are looser and more subtle. The recent (untitled, 30"x30) painting below is criss-crossed by barely perceptible lines drawn with graphite transfer paper and scratches.



My interest in crossing the picture plane with horizontal and vertical lines has been fed by looking at archaeological site maps, in preparing for my upcoming exhibit at the Pratt Museum in Homer, Alaska (opening August 2, 2013) as well as by observing the beautiful stone fences that cross the farm fields in County Kerry, Ireland, where I recently spend several weeks. It intrigues me how the same imagery can come from many sources, originating in a basic attraction to a simple form or visual idea.

 
Comments:
Great work.
 
thanks, BDG, and thanks for visiting my blog.
 
Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link



<< Home

       www.rebeccacrowell.com




     September 2005 /      October 2005 /      November 2005 /      December 2005 /      January 2006 /      February 2006 /      March 2006 /      April 2006 /      May 2006 /      June 2006 /      July 2006 /      August 2006 /      September 2006 /      October 2006 /      November 2006 /      December 2006 /      January 2007 /      February 2007 /      March 2007 /      April 2007 /      May 2007 /      June 2007 /      July 2007 /      August 2007 /      September 2007 /      October 2007 /      November 2007 /      December 2007 /      January 2008 /      February 2008 /      March 2008 /      April 2008 /      May 2008 /      June 2008 /      July 2008 /      August 2008 /      September 2008 /      October 2008 /      November 2008 /      December 2008 /      January 2009 /      February 2009 /      March 2009 /      April 2009 /      May 2009 /      June 2009 /      July 2009 /      August 2009 /      September 2009 /      October 2009 /      November 2009 /      December 2009 /      January 2010 /      February 2010 /      March 2010 /      April 2010 /      May 2010 /      June 2010 /      July 2010 /      August 2010 /      September 2010 /      October 2010 /      November 2010 /      December 2010 /      January 2011 /      February 2011 /      March 2011 /      April 2011 /      May 2011 /      June 2011 /      July 2011 /      August 2011 /      September 2011 /      October 2011 /      November 2011 /      December 2011 /      January 2012 /      February 2012 /      March 2012 /      April 2012 /      May 2012 /      June 2012 /      July 2012 /      August 2012 /      September 2012 /      October 2012 /      November 2012 /      December 2012 /      January 2013 /      February 2013 /      March 2013 /      April 2013 /      May 2013 /      June 2013 /      July 2013 /      August 2013 /      September 2013 /      October 2013 /      November 2013 /      December 2013 /      January 2014 /      February 2014 /      March 2014 /      April 2014 /      May 2014 /      June 2014 /      July 2014 /      August 2014 /      September 2014 /      October 2014 /      November 2014 /      December 2014 /      January 2015 /      February 2015 /      March 2015 /      April 2015 /      May 2015 /      June 2015 /      July 2015 /      August 2015 /      September 2015 /      October 2015 /      November 2015 /      December 2015 /      January 2016 /      February 2016 /      March 2016 /      April 2016 /      June 2016 /      July 2016 /      August 2016 /      September 2016 /      October 2016 /      November 2016 /      December 2016 /      January 2017 /      February 2017 /      March 2017 /      May 2017 /      June 2017 /

       Rebecca Crowell